The Great Wall (2016) 3D YIFY Movie

The Great Wall (2016) 3D

European mercenaries searching for black powder become embroiled in the defense of the Great Wall of China against a horde of monstrous creatures.

IMDB: 6.136 Likes

  • Genre: Action | Adventure
  • Quality: 3D
  • Size: 1.57G
  • Resolution: 1920*1080 / 23.976 fpsfps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 103
  • IMDB Rating: 6.1/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 2 / 24

The Synopsis for The Great Wall (2016) 3D

When a mercenary warrior (Matt Damon) is imprisoned within the Great Wall, he discovers the mystery behind one of the greatest wonders of the world. As wave after wave of marauding beasts besiege the massive structure, his quest for fortune turns into a journey toward heroism as he joins a huge army of elite warriors to confront the unimaginable and seemingly unstoppable force.


The Director and Players for The Great Wall (2016) 3D

[Director]Yimou Zhang
[Role:]Willem Dafoe
[Role:]Matt Damon
[Role:]Tian Jing


The Reviews for The Great Wall (2016) 3D


The Great Wall ShowMeTheMovies ReviewReviewed byJosh PadgettVote: 1/10

An attempt at a bombastic creature-feature resulting in a pathetic excuse for a film, with little bother for pacing or any form of decent storytelling, The Great Wall does not keep up with modern-day CGI or acting quality in the slightest.

Basing a movie around one type of enemy; that being one creature in this film, is entirely dependent on whether that monster poses a threat to the protagonists at all. Creating a creature which appears threatening or terrifying is not a simple task, the likes of a huge franchise like Alien took an entire movie to build the Xenomorph into the icon it is today - and The Great Wall does not manage this. At all.

The reptilians that are known as the Tao Tei in the film are not threatening at all, their presence in the film is so prolific, they behave more like rodents rather than any form of adversary for the protagonists. The first attack upon the wall is within the first 30 minutes from tens of thousands of the Tao Tei (so this isn't a spoiler at all), and they all simply retreat because Matt Damon manages to kill one of the beasts, despite the fact it appears as if they are beating the humans.

The greatest threat to the Nameless Order (the army and defenders of the Great Wall) is Ballard (Willem Dafoe), who is only interested in deserting the wall to save his own life, and that seems to be conveyed as the worst crime anyone could ever commit and is worth far more focus and screen time than any monster that could be a 'real' threat.

The acting and character writing in the film is on par with films like Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones or Star Trek: Nemesis. Matt Damon and Pedro Pascal's characters are supposed to be best of friends even if they seem to disagree with each other consistently throughout the film on whether it is worth staying to defend the wall with the Nameless Order, which implies that William (Matt Damon's Character) believes that his contribution among an army of tens of thousands will make a measurable difference.

The only decent performance is that of Willem Dafoe, who does the best job he can with what role he has been given - which honestly isn't a great deal. The portrayal of General Lin (Tian Jing) is not unique at all, and Matt Damon didn't really play a character at all. Ideally, the film would have had a main character with some form of relationship with any other character and would show some actual emotion rather than murdering monsters and pretending to do the 'honourable' thing by staying and fighting them, all whilst being praised as a hero for literally managing to kill one beast alone.

The truth is that this movie does not make sense, the ending is as unsatisfying as anything that came before it, and the only parts of the movie that look visually impressive in the slightest are the shots of the wall from afar, which are plentiful by the end of the film. There is some obsession with using slow motion to a ridiculous extent mid-action to the point that it is jarring to watch at times in this movie, and the pacing is so basic that the film is repetitive by the end and it's only just over 90 minutes long! To spend this much money on creating a movie like this is basically laughable, and the intent to blend Eastern and Western film isn't a success here at all; purely an eastern-influenced, poor-quality Hollywood picture. I'm certain it is very much possible to merge influences from genres and cultures both east and west, but this pitiful film certainly feels forced.

I could not recommend this laughably-rushed movie to anyone, and frankly I wouldn't watch it again if you paid me. Essentially a boring, badly-delivered joke with barely enough substance to even call itself a movie.

showme-themovies.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/review-great-wall.html

Exercising Your DamonsReviewed bybob-the-movie-manVote: 5/10

Millions of people watching the 2017 Oscars would have seen Jimmy Kimmel roasting poor Matt Damon as a part of their long running 'feud'. At one point he points out that Matt gave up the leading role in "Manchester by the Sea" to star in a "Chinese ponytail movie" that "went on to lose $80 million at the box office". "The Great Wall" is that movie!

So is it really that bad?

Well, it's no "Manchester by the Sea" for sure. But I don't think it's quite the total turkey that critics have been labelling it as either. I went to see it on a Sunday afternoon, and approaching it as a matinée bit of frothy action is a good mental state to be in.

Matt Damon plays the ponytailed-wonder William, a European mercenary travelling in 11th Century China with his colleague Tovar (Pedro Pascal) in an attempt to determine the secrets of black powder – a secret well-guarded by the Chinese. Captured by the 'New Order' at the Great Wall and imprisoned there by General Shao (Hanyu Zhang), William earns the respect of Shao and his beautiful warrior second- in- command Lin Mae (Tian Jing) with his bowmanship. This is almost immediately put to use by the arrival (after 60 year's absence – a funny thing, timing, isn't it?) of hoards of vicious creatures called Taoties. (I thought they said Tauntauns initially, so was expecting some sort of Chinese/Star Wars crossover! But no.)

Taoties who scale the wall are defeated by William who poleaxes them. (This is an attempt at brilliant humour to anyone who has already seen the film – poleaxe?. get it? POLEaxe. Oh, never mind!) Despite being a mercenary at heart, William is torn between staying and helping Lin Mae fight the beasts and fleeing with Tovar, their new chum Ballard (Willem Dafoe) and their black powder loot. (I'm sure something about Lin Mae's tight-fitting blue armour was influential in his decision).

This is an historic film in that although in recent years there has been cross-fertilization of Chinese actors into Western films for box-office reasons (for example, in the appalling "Independence Day: Resurgence" and the much better Damon vehicle "The Martian") this was the first truly co-produced Chinese/Hollywood feature filmed entirely in China. It might also be the last given the film's $150 million budget and the dismal box-office!

To start with some positives, you can rely on a Chinese-set film (the film location was Qingdao) to allow the use of an army of extras and – although a whole bunch of CGI was also no doubt used – some of the battles scenes are impressive. There is a stirring choral theme by Ramin Djawadi (best known for his TV themes for "Game of Thrones" and the brilliant "Westworld") played over silk-screen painted end titles that just make for a beautiful combination. And Tian Jing as the heroine Lin Mae is not only stunningly good-looking but also injects some much needed acting talent into the cast, where most of those involved (including Damon himself) look like they would rather be somewhere else.

And some of the action scenes are rather fun in a 'park your brain by the door' sort of way, including (nonsensically) cute warrior girls high-diving off the wall on bungey ropes to near certain death. While the CGI monsters are of the (yawn) over-the-top LoTR variety, their ability to swarm like locusts at the Queen's command is also quite entertainingly rendered.

Where the movie balloon comes crashing down to earth in flames though is with the story and the screenplay – all done by three different people each, which is NEVER a good sign.

The story (by Max Brooks ("World War Z"), Edward Zwick and Marshall Herskovitz (both on "The Last Samurai") is plain nonsensical at times. No spoilers here, but the transition from "wall under siege" to "wall not under siege" gives the word 'clunky' a bad name. As another absurdity, the "New Order" seem amazed how William was able to slay one of the creatures (thanks to the poleaxing 'McGuffin' previously referenced) but then throughout the rest of the film he slays creatures left right and centre (McGuffin-less) through just the use of a spear or an arrow! Bonkers.

Things get worse when you add words to the actions. The screenplay by Carlo Bernard and Doug Miro (both "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time") and Tony Gilroy (Tony Gilroy? Surely not he of all the "Bourne" films and "Rogue One" fame? The very same!) has a reading age of about an 8 year old. It feels like it has been translated into Chinese and then back again to English with Google Translate. "Is that the best you can do?" asks Tovar to William at one point. I was thinking exactly the same thing.

The combination of the cinematography and the special effects have the unfortunate effect of giving the film the veneer of a video game, but this is one where your kid-brother has stolen the controls and refuses to give them back to you.

Having had the great thrill of visiting a section of The Great Wall near Beijing, I can confirm that it is an astonishing engineering masterpiece that has to be seen to be truly believed. It ranks as one of the genuine wonders of the world. The same can not be said of this movie. Early teens might enjoy it as a mindless action flick. But otherwise best avoided until it emerges on a raining Sunday afternoon on the TV.

(For the graphical version of this review, and to comment, please visit bob-the-movie-man.com).

Reviewed byRobert Setlock, IIIVote: 4/10/10

The famous Great Wall was built to keep out the evil hordes: peoplewith a lot of problems, drug dealers, murderers rapists, and (I assume)some good people. Wait a minute, wrong wall.

Regardless, The Great Wall embraces a new direction currently seen infilmmaking. Many movies, like Transformers 4, have featured Chineselocations prominently with the hope of getting into Chinese theaters.The rules to get into Chinese theaters are long and complex and therules as to how much money an American studio can make from thosetheaters is even more complex. So, US-Chinese co- productions like TheGreat Wall could become the rule rather than the exception.

Consequently, the story behind how a movie like The Great Wall getsproduced, is way more interesting than the movie itself. The Great Wallis movie where things happen not out of natural plot development orcharacter motivations, things happen because the script says theyhappen.

The best example of this lack of plot development is the revelationthat the creatures made it to the other side of the wall. How theyaccomplish this daunting feat is neither explained nor shown to theaudience. Suddenly, a guard tells Matt Damon that it's happened andthat's that. Perhaps the creatures paid a toll?

Speaking of which, the creatures and main villain of this movie aresimply put ugly green poorly rendered computer dogs. Not creepy uglylike the Predator or Alien. Just ugly ugly. Additionally, they expressno motivation or intelligence for their machinations beyond the need toget food for their queen. That's the limit of their complexity, thisfrom the main antagonists throughout the movie.

I guess I could go into Willem Dafoe's role in the movie, but then I'dquickly be doing more work on his character than the script did.Further, Matt Damon's character has a friend (played by Pedro Pascal)that travels with him throughout the story whose contribution is nearlynon-existent.

In fact, one could streamline this script and tell the same story withjust Matt Damon's character and a selection of random guards. One couldargue that all the extra story lines and characters are red herrings.However, that would imply that these elements at one time seemimportant. They never do. The movie is nothing more than genericthrowaway monsters versus shallow throwaway heroes.

Sadly enough, some good ideas are here. For instance, to signal howthey'll attack the creatures the soldier use drumbeats to unify theiraction quickly. This is not only a nifty military technique, but, moreimportantly, provides a good driving bass to the action and,unfortunately, is criminally underused here. The use of color on theChinese soldiers is frequently beautiful. However, the way they attackthe amassing hordes from the wall swiftly ranges from very cool to verystupid.

Presumably, they could create a decent video game from this movie,which brings us full circle to the techniques movie makers embrace tomake money.

I watched trailers for this movie and although I didn't expect greatart, I did think it could be dumb fun. Well, I was half right.

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